Comments ( 6 )

  • Judy Martin

    Hi folks,

    Oddly enough your post inspired me to write a new post. You talk about raising our collective voices in your article. And that means not only in the external venue of media and advocacy, but also internally in our organizations. That’s a difficult conversation. There doesn’t seem to be a fool proof way to do it across sectors but some companies seemed to have scored. That means they’re designing a workplace where they can foster an environment where they can “co-create conscious conversations” with employees. Corporate culture needs to shift in order to do that. Posts like yours, start the conversations that need to take place.

    @JudyMartin8

    • Lisa

      Judy, I appreciate you kicking off this dialogue – and really resonate with what you say. Your view that “co-creating conscious conversations” is both essential and difficult in our workplaces. There is no “cookie cutter” solution for work life balance or for any of the challenging dilemmas we face in a global economy. But “we the people” – the same species who put men on the moon and invented the internet – can surely innovate work environments that are both efficient and caring through courageous and participatory conversations. Thank you for being an affirming voice in this conversation! Lisa Jackson

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  • Kathy Igoe

    Well done, Lisa. Your blog on Corporate Culture and Work-Life Balance couldn’t be more timely. It hits home on two levels for me, personally and professionally.

    Until recently, due to the impossible demands of an under-staffed Fortune 500 corporation (I’ll leave un-named) my husband was coming home over-stressed, unfulfilled and bereft of spirit. He’d always dreamed of working for this company, and once achieved, he was unable to contribute to his full potential and desire due to the “old-guard culture” you describe. He expressed his dissatisfaction and proposed solutions over the course of five plus years to no avail. When he decided to throw in the towel, mourn the loss of his dream, and began to search for someplace to work that would take advantage of his unique talents, he recieved two excellent offers (and even a pointless counter-offer from his now old employer, as they couldn’t address his rationale for leaving). Now he is (and I am) hopeful that the new organization will provide an environment responsive and supportive of the innovative and productive person that he is when free from the shackles of the old culture.

    For myself, as a professional Leadership, Career and Life Coach, I work with individual clients who are struggling with these same issues. They seek me out, independent of their organization’s internal offering of coaching, because they don’t trust their employer or internal coach to work with them in a way that is best for them. There is a lot of the “old guard culture” packed into that perception. While some of these clients have coaching outcomes to assist them with managing themselves to stay within the organization in a healthier way, just as many are seeking to manage their transition out of the organization into a more balanced employer relationship, working on their own work-life balance “way of being” as well. Yet these organziations don’t seem to recognize this as a dire symptom of a life-threatening illness within the organism that is the organization.

    I am engaged in my Michigan professional coaching community around this issue and hope to influence organizations and individuals to get engaged as well. Thank you for contributing so well to the conversation and leading the way as you are as corporate culture change-makers . Sincerely, Kathy Igoe

  • Barny

    Until recently, due to the impossible demands of an under-staffed Fortune 500 corporation (I’ll leave un-named) my husband was coming home over-stressed, unfulfilled and bereft of spirit. He’d always dreamed of working for this company, and once achieved, he was unable to contribute to his full potential and desire due to the “old-guard culture” you describe. He expressed his dissatisfaction and proposed solutions over the course of five plus years to no avail. When he decided to throw in the towel, mourn the loss of his dream, and began to search for someplace to work that would take advantage of his unique talents, he recieved two excellent offers (and even a pointless counter-offer from his now old employer, as they couldn’t address his rationale for leaving). Now he is (and I am) hopeful that the new organization will provide an environment responsive and supportive of the innovative and productive person that he is when free from the shackles of the old culture.
    +1

    • Lisa

      Wow, what a heartening example of the misalignment between a person and the organization they dedicate themselves to.
      So glad you are finding a better corporate culture for your talents!

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